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Resources - Moodle (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment)
by Admin User - Wednesday, August 8, 2018, 5:39 PM
 

eLearning/LMS Moodle site support information (Click - "Discuss this topic" below for more information or to add additional resources!)

Moodle 3.2 Documents

Moodle 3.2 New Features


Moodle YouTube Channel
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What is an LMS?
by Admin User - Friday, July 15, 2016, 11:34 AM
 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_management_system

"An LMS is the infrastructure that delivers and manages instructional content, identifies and assesses individual and organizational learning or training goals, tracks the progress towards meeting those goals, and collects and presents data for supervising the learning process of the organization as a whole.[7] A learning management system delivers content but also handles registering for courses, course administration, skills gap analysis, tracking, and reporting.[8]"

 
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Moodle Questions or Help
by Admin User - Monday, August 10, 2015, 5:53 PM
 

Welcome to our campus Moodle eLearning Site.

If you need help or have a question please contact the Moodle Administrator, Mr. McIntosh.

eMail: bmcintosh@midpac.edu


 

Available courses

At its core, argumentative writing requires a real purpose, a real audience, a real" voice," and real reasons. This class will examine the techniques of rhetoric (defined as the art of persuasion in effective writing and speaking) and explore fallacies in logic. 

Words and images abound in today’s society. We get information from print, audio, and video sources, and, perhaps most prevalently, from the Internet. What we know collectively as “the media” is so influential, understanding it should be a priority. Today, truth is perception, and students must be able to understand how perceptions are shaped. Being media literate means readers and viewers control the interpretation of the media instead of it controlling us. Students will explore media studies theory and put those theories into practice by examining the language, images, narratives, and truths (or perceptions) they encounter in traditional or alternative news sources, advertising, television, politics, sports, social media, and other cultural institutions.


As we struggle to understand the very nature of war, we must ask: through war, do individuals ennoble or degrade themselves? War is never far from our consciousness and therefore intrigues us. Authors record wars, examining their social and emotional toll, supporting or protesting the policies associated with them, and contemplating the lessons they offer on human nature. In this course, students will examine novels, historical documents, poetry, letters, and other media capturing these defining moments. Ultimately, students should gain an understanding as to the role of the individual within the social context of war and the role of literature in examining the reasons for an impact of war; is it purely social commentary or is there an aesthetic, artistic purpose?


This course is designed to expose students to the foundational literary concepts on which so much is built in the literary community. Literature in this course will encompass Greek mythology and biblical lore—seminal sources that continue to resurface in literature and in varied aspects of culture in general—as well as Shakespeare and more modern works. Additionally, students will explore the basic literary elements of fiction, poetry, and drama. They will write both creative and analytical papers, with an emphasis on comparison/contrast essays, as they continue to enhance their vocabulary and polish their grammatical skills.


There are thousands of thoughts lying within a man that he does not know till he takes up the pen and writes. --William Makepeace Thackeray


We live in a world inundated with words. They can be seen in newspapers, magazines, journals, and anthologies, even heard on radio and television. The essay is a written extension of a person's desire to make a statement. The essay can range from the inflammatory to the sublime, from the vulgar to the refined, expressing a multitude of voices.

This course explores the wide range of personal essay writing. Students will read and then imitate various forms of essay, from creative non- fiction to more formal thesis-driven, persuasive essays. In addition to studying form, students will learn to consider audience, purpose, tone, and selection of detail as they move through multiple drafts of each piece of writing.

The literature studied in this course encourages students to reflect upon the experiences surrounding us that move us out of a state of innocence and allow us to grow into experienced individuals. Students will look at literature that attempts to chronicle the human experience, thereby providing them with knowledge and experiences necessary for growth and enlightenment. 

Human emotions exert a powerful and complex influence on human psychology and actions. The deep psychological intricacies of the human mind and the vast range of emotions existing in the human heart have fascinated authors and readers since the first written word. This class will examine the aspects of life that drive our behavior, focusing primarily on emotions and the stimuli that cause our emotional responses. The literature in this course will explore the complicated interplay between the human heart and mind, providing students with insight into human psychology, including, ideally, their own. 

This interdisciplinary college-level course aims to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Environmental problems are identified and evaluated and possible solutions are examined. In addition students explore their own perspectives and beliefs in order to identify their own environmental value system. The major topics central to this course include Earth systems and resources, ecology, population, land and water use, energy, pollution, and global change.

This is a one semester science elective course introducing the roles and techniques used by CSI scientists to detect, collect, document, analyze, and present evidence from crime scenes.

This pre-college level course in biology can be taken as either a one-year class to prepare students for the IB (SL) exam or year 1 of a two-year course geared to preparing students for the AP and/or IB (HL) exam in biology. Topics include biochemistry, genetics, evolution, ecology, biodiversity, and animal and plant form and function. Some labs may require extra time after school. All students that continue to the second year of the course are required to take the AP and/or IB (HL) examination, which is subject to examination fees.

This one-semester course covers many areas of science as they apply to the ocean. The main emphasis of this course is on the biological and environmental aspects of the ocean. Instruction includes a mix of group and individual projects, hands-on activities and labs, multimedia presentations, supplementary readings, and a field trip.


Chemistry is about understanding what happens in the world all round us. The course is designed to help students to understand the fundamental and basic concepts of chemistry, including but not limited to: measurements, materials, atomic structure, chemical reactions, energy, acids and bases, and much more.

This is a more challenging introductory course that covers the basic concepts of chemistry (physical states, atoms and molecules, periodicity, solutions, acids and bases, chemical formulas, nomenclature and equations, stoichiometry, gas laws, reaction rates and equilibrium, oxidation and reduction, energy changes, and organic chemistry). IB students will be required to keep a portfolio of their lab work for both internal and external assessment.

Students enrolled in this course can elect to take the IB SL examination (unless continuing to the higher level), which is subject to an examination fee.


Integrated Science I

This introductory course will ground students in and develop their understanding of key concepts of Chemistry and Physics. Curricular topics include structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions, forces and interactions, energy, waves and electromagnetic radiation. While learning key concepts in Physical sciences, students will gain lab science skills by developing and using models, designing and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations it is through these practices that students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the core concepts. 

Integrated Science 2:  This introductory course will ground students in and develop their understanding of key concepts of Biology and Ecology. Curricular topics include chemistry of life, systems basics, photosynthesis, cell respiration, ecosystems, life systems, genetics, biodiversity, and human impact. While learning key concepts in Life Science, students will gain lab science skills by developing and using models, designing and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations it is through these practices that students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the core concepts.

Students in high school continue to develop their understanding of the three disciplinary core ideas in the Earth and Space Sciences. The high school performance expectations in Earth and Space Science build on the middle school ideas and skills and allow high school students to explain more in-depth phenomena central not only to the earth and space sciences, but to life and physical sciences as well. These performance expectations blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing useable knowledge to explain ideas across the science disciplines. While the performance expectations shown in high school earth and space science couple particular practices with specific disciplinary core ideas, instructional decisions should include use of many practices that lead to the performance expectations.

Earth’s Place in the Universe, help students formulate an answer to the question: “What is the universe, and what is Earth’s place in it?”

Earth’s Systems, help students formulate an answer to the question: “How and why is Earth constantly changing?”

Earth and Human Activity help students formulate an answer to the question: “How do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?”

 

Integrated Science 2:  This introductory course will ground students in and develop their understanding of key concepts of Biology and Ecology. Curricular topics include chemistry of life, systems basics, photosynthesis, cell respiration, ecosystems, life systems, genetics, biodiversity, and human impact. While learning key concepts in Life Science, students will gain lab science skills by developing and using models, designing and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations it is through these practices that students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the core concepts.

This one-semester course covers all areas of science as they apply to the ocean. The main emphasis of this course is on the biological and environmental aspects of the ocean. Instruction includes a mix of projects, hands-on activities and labs, multimedia presentations, supplementary readings, and field trips. 

This introductory course will ground students in and develop their understanding of key concepts of Chemistry and Physics. Curricular topics include structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions, forces and interactions, energy, waves and electromagnetic radiation.

While learning key concepts in Physical sciences, students will gain lab science skills by developing and using models, designing and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations it is through these practices that students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the core concepts. 

Students in high school continue to develop their understanding of the three disciplinary core ideas in the Earth and Space Sciences. The high school performance expectations in Earth and Space Science build on the middle school ideas and skills and allow high school students to explain more in-depth phenomena central not only to the earth and space sciences, but to life and physical sciences as well. These performance expectations blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing useable knowledge to explain ideas across the science disciplines. While the performance expectations shown in high school earth and space science couple particular practices with specific disciplinary core ideas, instructional decisions should include use of many practices that lead to the performance expectations.

Earth’s Place in the Universe, help students formulate an answer to the question: “What is the universe, and what is Earth’s place in it?”

Earth’s Systems, help students formulate an answer to the question: “How and why is Earth constantly changing?”

Earth and Human Activity help students formulate an answer to the question: “How do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?”

 

AQUAPONICS – BLENDED COURSE SEMESTER COURSE, Offered Both Semesters

Prerequisite: Completion of Science graduation requirements


Aquaponics is the integration of aquaculture and hydroponics in a closed recirculating system. Throughout this hands-on course, students will apply their knowledge in the biological and physical sciences to techniques in raising fish and plants together in an aquaponics system. In addition to learning about the basic components involved, students will develop the skills and knowledge needed to perform the day-to- day operations required to maintain a successful aquaponics system. By focusing on sustainability this course addresses the role of aquaponics in helping to solve global concerns such as threatened food supplies and increasing energy consumption.

This is a second-year physics course that is taught at the college freshman level. It has the dual purpose of preparing students for the Advanced Placement Physics B examination or the IB Physics-Higher Level examination. Students should expect a level of rigor similar to that found in a non-calculus based college freshman physics course. One of the primary objectives of this course is to give the student a solid foundation in the principles and techniques of physics. The focus will be on the application of these principles to the solution of problems. The material will be systematically developed with a level of mathematical rigor expected of college freshmen with the aim of developing rational thinking through problem-solving skills. Another objective is to develop in students an understanding and appreciation of the scientific process itself through experimentation and demonstrations.

All students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP and/or IB examination, which is subject to examination fees. 

Students in high school continue to develop their understanding of the three disciplinary core ideas in the Earth and Space Sciences. The high school performance expectations in Earth and Space Science build on the middle school ideas and skills and allow high school students to explain more in-depth phenomena central not only to the earth and space sciences, but to life and physical sciences as well. These performance expectations blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing useable knowledge to explain ideas across the science disciplines. While the performance expectations shown in high school earth and space science couple particular practices with specific disciplinary core ideas, instructional decisions should include use of many practices that lead to the performance expectations.

Earth’s Place in the Universe, help students formulate an answer to the question: “What is the universe, and what is Earth’s place in it?”

Earth’s Systems, help students formulate an answer to the question: “How and why is Earth constantly changing?”

Earth and Human Activity help students formulate an answer to the question: “How do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?”

 

Integrated Science I

This introductory course will ground students in and develop their understanding of key concepts of Chemistry and Physics. Curricular topics include structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions, forces and interactions, energy, waves and electromagnetic radiation. While learning key concepts in Physical sciences, students will gain lab science skills by developing and using models, designing and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations it is through these practices that students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the core concepts. 

Integrated Science 2:  This introductory course will ground students in and develop their understanding of key concepts of Biology and Ecology. Curricular topics include chemistry of life, systems basics, photosynthesis, cell respiration, ecosystems, life systems, genetics, biodiversity, and human impact. While learning key concepts in Life Science, students will gain lab science skills by developing and using models, designing and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations it is through these practices that students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the core concepts.

Designed to meet the needs of today’s scientifically literate citizen, this activity-oriented introductory course aims to be useful and interesting to students with widely differing skills, backgrounds, and career plans. Topics include mechanics, energy, electricity and magnetism, and waves. Each unit is made up of a wide variety of learning experiences, including multimedia presentations, computer-based simulations, and hands-on laboratory activities. Students will use computers in the gathering and analysis of data through the use of computer-based sensors and graphing programs. Projects are conducted every quarter; the second project in each semester is assessed in lieu of a final exam. 

U.S. History is a year-long required course examining the history of the United States from the 17th century to the present. The course explores the political and economic development of the United States with an aim towards familiarizing students with the institutions and thought systems that have had a significant influence on our modern country. A key objective of the course is to explain continuity and change through time and through individual events. U.S. History explores the political, social, economic, religious, technological, and cultural aspects of our country’s origin and relationship with the world. In addition to providing an in-depth analysis of events and movements in U.S. history, the course is designed to prepare students for the rigors of the International Baccalaureate program by emphasizing the development of 21st Century learning skills, including critical thinking and problem solving, an exploration of historical perspective, collaboration, primary and secondary document analysis, independent research, authentic assessment, and effective oral and written communication. The course incorporates place-based learning, community experts, simulations, community presentations of learning, and national activities such as History Day.

Class Activities/Assignments

ITGS is a subject that:

  • Focuses on the systematic and critical study of human experience and behavior relating to the relationship between human beings and information and communication technologies (IT systems).
  • Requires students to have sufficient technical knowledge of IT systems to be able to make informed decisions about their use (digital wisdom in contrast to digital literacy).
  • Discusses the moral and ethical issues leading to informed decisions being made about the development, implementation, use and disposal of IT systems.
  • Discusses the social impacts that may result from the development, implementation, use and disposal of IT systems.
  • Requires students to be able to competently use a range of digital technologies (digital literacy).

“Be prepared for lots of hands-on modeling, construction and building!”

This course introduces the design cycle model—a fundamental concept underpinning the design process and central to a learner’s understanding of design activities. Each element of the design cycle represents how designers progress through the design process to refine the design solution in increasing detail. You will analyze and understand the strengths and limitations of designed prototypes and apply modifications, thereby participating in an iterative engineering design process. The topic then moves on to focus on the strategies that designers use to arrive at solutions to problems and the varied nature of the skills and knowledge they need to carry out their activities successfully. Hands-on topics will include, but will not be limited to; Design Process, Product Innovation, Green Design, Materials, Product Development, Product Design, Evaluation, Energy, Structures, Mechanical Design, and Sustainable Development. Using various 3D technologies and exploring several 3D modeling software packages you will turn your ideas into real products with cutting edge 3D printers and scanners. The course assumes no prior knowledge in design or technology.

This course can meet one of the physical/laboratory science graduation requirements.

“Multiple technologies exploring multiple applications!

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This course offers a high-tech workshop for students to explore, investigate, design, prototype, and select projects designed to solve real- world issues in various technology fields. Topics to be introduced and explored may include, but not limited to; Mechanical Systems & Structures, Computer Graphics & 3D Design, Multimedia Design, Alternative & Renewable Energy, Robotics & Computer Control Technology, and Circuitry. Various software applications will be utilized to explore multiple topics including, post audio and music editing, architectural design, 3D prototyping & printing, and Desktop Publishing. Experiences may utilize 3D printing & scanning, LEGO Robotics, Arduino Microelectronics Systems, Laser Components, and Structural Stress Testing. Learners create custom ePortfolios in the form of iBooks using iBook Author to present learning. 

This course is a continuation of Spanish I. Speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills are emphasized. Students will use Spanish in communicative activities to apply basic knowledge acquired in Spanish I and in this class. Students should be able to converse on simple topics and write simple compositions. Teacher may assign internet activities, video and in-class presentations and projects related to topics covered in class. 

This course is a continuation of Spanish II and focuses on more advanced grammar and vocabulary. It is also an introduction to reading more complex texts and some Hispanic literature. As in Spanish II, students will use Spanish in communicative activities and also apply knowledge acquired in this class to write compositions, carry out internet activities, play linguistic games, make video and in-class presentations, and collaborate in projects. In this class, students will acquire skills required to successfully complete Spanish IV-IB. 

This course is designed for students who wish to continue the study of Spanish and prepare for the International Baccalaureate exam. This program further covers advanced grammar and vocabulary using a grammar book and supplementary material provided by the teacher. Class is conducted in Spanish and students are expected to use Spanish in class as much as possible. Focus is on speaking, writing compositions, reading comprehension, and intense reinforcement of grammatical structure. As in Spanish, II, III, and IV, students will do communicative activities, video and in-class presentations, and projects related to the Hispanic world. Students will also read Spanish newspapers on a weekly basis and discuss current affairs. In this class students will consolidate lifetime skills that will allow them to continue independently study the language in more depth.

All students enrolled in this course are required to take the IB examination, which is subject to an examination fee. 

A course Sand Box for faculty to play and learn.